19 Jun 2012

15 Things Charles and Ray Eames Teach Us

mostexerent:

  1. Keep good company
  2. Notice the ordinary
  3. Preserve the ephemeral
  4. Design not for the elite but for the masses
  5. Explain it to a child
  6. Get lost in the content
  7. Get to the heart of the matter
  8. Never tolerate “O.K. anything.”
  9. Remember your responsibility as a storyteller
  10. Zoom out
  11. Switch
  12. Prototype it
  13. Pun
  14. Make design your life… and life, your design.
  15. Leave something behind.

Solid. 

(Source: nevver)


9 Jan 2012

I recently watched a version of Pulp Fiction that followed the chronological order and it was pretty awesome. The graphic above shows that timeline and how it was shifted around in Quentin Tarentino’s original version. 
(via Infographic: Pulp Fiction In Chronological Sequence)

I recently watched a version of Pulp Fiction that followed the chronological order and it was pretty awesome. The graphic above shows that timeline and how it was shifted around in Quentin Tarentino’s original version. 

(via Infographic: Pulp Fiction In Chronological Sequence)

3 Jan 2012

Yes, this is a flask disguised as a Sony Walkman.

Flask creator Mustard claims it won’t be available until mid-May, so for the time being we  can only marvel at the incredible attention to detail—with a host of  faux buttons and a convincing cassette spindle graphic—and postulate  about how much it’s going to cost.

Ironically, the Walkman will almost certainly draw more attention than a regular flask would.
(Via Gizmodo)

Yes, this is a flask disguised as a Sony Walkman.

Flask creator Mustard claims it won’t be available until mid-May, so for the time being we can only marvel at the incredible attention to detail—with a host of faux buttons and a convincing cassette spindle graphic—and postulate about how much it’s going to cost.

Ironically, the Walkman will almost certainly draw more attention than a regular flask would.

(Via Gizmodo)

22 Dec 2011

I love transportation maps, and this one is epic:

Australian designer Cameron Booth has designed a map of the United States Highway system as if it were a public transportation subway map. What a brilliant piece of graphic design. You can pick it up for just $39.

(Via Colossal)

21 Dec 2011

TinType Photography | Bob Shimmin from Kalamazoo Valley Museum on Vimeo.

It’s important to understand how media and art changes because of the mechanisms that make them possible, in this case, the way that tintype photography appears is because of the science behind how it works. That’s something that changes as technology advances, but shouldn’t be lost:

Photographer Robert Shimmin has revived a 150-year old photographic tradition known as “tintype” in which photos are printed directly on a lacquered sheet of iron. The image you see is technically a negative; the dark parts are the metal showing through, while the light parts are formed by the emulsion.

Tintype initially got popular because it was a one-step process — the negative is the print — and that allowed photographers to pump out the images quickly. They were popular in public settings like amusement parks, where mobile photographers could snap your image and hand it to you after a few minutes.

But if you want to get a feel for why tintype is would be interesting as an artform, I think Shimmin nails it. There’s something about our proximity to this technology that makes it more interesting than film or digital photography.

(Via Alexis Madrigal)

13 Dec 2011

From Fashion to Housewares, Are We in a Decades-long Design Rut? By Kurt Anderson (Vainty Fair)

This essay is fascinating and incredible - basically Anderson suggests that throughout the past design has wildly changed every 20 years, but not much has changed since 1992. He says some of that may have to do with radical technological, political and economic changes have allowed us to focus on the past instead of innovating new designs:

Why is this happening? In some large measure, I think, it’s an unconscious collective reaction to all the profound nonstop newness we’re experiencing on the tech and geopolitical and economic fronts. People have a limited capacity to embrace flux and strangeness and dissatisfaction, and right now we’re maxed out. So as the Web and artificially intelligent smartphones and the rise of China and 9/11 and the winners-take-all American economy and the Great Recession disrupt and transform our lives and hopes and dreams, we are clinging as never before to the familiar in matters of style and culture.

And:

Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose has always meant that the constant novelty and flux of modern life is all superficial show, that the underlying essences endure unchanged. But now, suddenly, that saying has acquired an alternative and nearly opposite definition: the more certain things change for real (technology, the global political economy), the more other things (style, culture) stay the same.

This is article is a must read.

On a related note, it has led me to re-think my approach to this blog. I created it to act as a board to post the things which fascinate, amuse and excite me about the world, but recently it has instead devolved into a place where I find a random smattering of things from the internet and post them every day. That’s not my desire and runs counter to my creative and intellectual desires and sensibility. Therefore I will be striving to change my ways by posting:

  1. Things which I feel are amusing, interesting or relevant, while trying to post less actively nostalgic or back-ward looking
  2. Things and ideas which are socially relevant or show a new or innovative perspective on the world. 

As always, e-mail me if you have any questions/comments or suggestions.


9 Dec 2011

(via Artist Recreates Van Gogh Paintings with Cooking Ingredients)

9 Dec 2011

I can never get enough of these:
(via Polish Cold War Neon)

I can never get enough of these:

(via Polish Cold War Neon)

9 Dec 2011

I love how these PVC sculptures capture a sense of motion:

These whimsical sculptures by Korean artist Kang Duck-Bong are made by adhering myriad cuts of PVC pipe and covering them in a  thick shellac of urethane paint. The process creates an uncanny sense of  motion, the figures appearing blurred and perpetually in motion.

(Via colossal)

I love how these PVC sculptures capture a sense of motion:

These whimsical sculptures by Korean artist Kang Duck-Bong are made by adhering myriad cuts of PVC pipe and covering them in a thick shellac of urethane paint. The process creates an uncanny sense of motion, the figures appearing blurred and perpetually in motion.

(Via colossal)

8 Dec 2011

Here’s to the crazy ones…

7 Dec 2011

What type of geek are you?

An infographic by Flowtown looks at ‘geeks’ and their evolution.  These days it’s cool to be geeky, but back in 1500s, when the term  was first coined, it meant that someone who was considered a “fool”—it  was also thought to have come from the word “gecken”, which were circus  performers who bit off the heads of live chicken.

(Via Design Taxi)

What type of geek are you?

An infographic by Flowtown looks at ‘geeks’ and their evolution.

These days it’s cool to be geeky, but back in 1500s, when the term was first coined, it meant that someone who was considered a “fool”—it was also thought to have come from the word “gecken”, which were circus performers who bit off the heads of live chicken.

(Via Design Taxi)

6 Dec 2011

Hero from Miguel Endara on Vimeo.

That’s a lot of dots:

Starting with a goofy portrait of his father’s photocopied face artist Miquel Endara embarked on an ambitious stipple drawing, using 3.2 million dots from assorted Micron pens to recreate the image on paper. Watch the wonderfully shot video above condensing 210 hours of drawing to see how he did it and also check out his website where he has a zoomable high-res version of the image.

(Via Colossal)

5 Dec 2011

What seven billion people looks like
(Via FlowingData)

30 Nov 2011

28 Nov 2011

Single-sheet sculptures: It’s amazing to see art created with tight constraints like using only a single sheet of paper.
(via Using Only Paper, Artist Crafts Stunning Sculptures)

Single-sheet sculptures: It’s amazing to see art created with tight constraints like using only a single sheet of paper.

(via Using Only Paper, Artist Crafts Stunning Sculptures)